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Sticker store started in July

November 14, 2016 |

Teresasoft is Game and SW development company  specialized in delivering quality, cost effective, user friendly and result-oriented web designing, website development and Graphics (animation, multimedia… A Team of Expertise:- One of the core strengths is its deep technical skills. We owned and managed by highly specified ex-developers, digital marketers . we adopt a global approach in our Application development services, which further helps us raise our standards with every project we pursue. Teresasoftl web solution programmers will build the Web application using state of the art and industry-standard development tools. Beginning with the structure and housing of the data sets and completing with the user-defined actions. Not Just A Development Company:- Unlike many software companies, we have hands-harshly experience of exactly what is important to creating a software-based business..

Luigi’s death stare: are you enjoying Mario Kart 8?

November 14, 2016 |

Mario Kart 8 has been out in the UK for a few weeks now, leading to a large increase in sales for the Wii U console. It’s even seen the birth of its own meme: the Luigi death stare, a celebration of the lesser-heralded Mario brother’s ice-cold reaction to the administration of shell-based justice. I spent the weekend getting to grips with the latest Mario Kart iteration, sunny weather eschewed in favour of relentless four-player action. Early impressions are positive. The karts drive, glide and slide like a dream, and as our review points out, the new weapons are a satisfying addition. And there are little pleasing tweaks that make logical sense: if you plunge off the course into a cute ravine, lakitu returns you to the track much more efficiently than before, power-up boxes reappear a touch more quickly, and there is now a means of combatting the blue…    read more 

Nintendo’s rejection of gay relationships gives fans a lot to be angry about

November 14, 2016 |

Nintendo of America will not allow gay relationships in Tomodachi Life, and their logic for doing so just doesn’t add up Nintendo Tomodachi Life Tomodachi Life, a life simulator game, does not allow gay relationships between characters. Photograph: AP Photograph: AP Yannick LeJacq Thu 8 May 2014 15.47 BST Last modified on Thu 16 Apr 2020 14.34 BST Nintendo often seems like the rarest kind of corporate entity: one that only inspires feelings of goodwill from its customers both past and present. Even as the company continues to flounder in its current state of financial insecurity, much of the criticism from fans, detractors and industry analysts is delivered as if from a concerned friend, rather than a dispassionate onlooker. That changed on Wednesday, when Nintendo of America (NOA) responded to a social media campaign asking the company to allow players to enter into gay relationships in its game Tomodachi Life…    read more 

Blast ‘Em – your next unstoppable gaming compulsion

November 14, 2016 |

Blast ‘Em – your next unstoppable gaming compulsion If you are anything like me, you can split your life into two distinct times: the time before Super Hexagon existed, and the time afterwards. Since the Hexagon Dateline, you will have spent significant lengths of time staring at moving hexagons of crisp light on your phone or your computer screen, listening to pulsing chiptune, learning absolutely useless skills like how to cope when the hexagon suddenly becomes a pentagon or the right way to get through those really annoying hook-shaped patterns on Hexagoner. And if you’ve even touched Flappy Bird once then you, like me, will be aware of how some games can feed on the part of your brain that just wants you to be a little bit better, and how once you’ve begun to play, stopping can be incredibly hard. I was an hour and a half into my…    read more 

The six best retro consoles for modern gamers

November 14, 2016 |

People often make the mistake of thinking that video games are a relentlessly forward-looking medium. It’s all about the next big release, the next console generation, the next PC graphics card technology. Except it isn’t really. Games are, like most other artforms these days, obsessively self-referential. They are constantly mining the past for successful ideas, merging old genres to create strange new ones, or simply borrowing the aesthetics of past generations. If modern games have one fault (they probably have more, but let’s not go there), it’s that they can seem intimidating to newcomers because they rely so much on age-old conventions and traditions. Also, old consoles are nice. They look weird and thrilling, with their chunky plastic bodies and their gigantic cartridge ports. They are relics of fun, nostalgic artifacts that remind us of childhoods spent waiting patiently for games to load from cassettes, or blowing the dust out…    read more 

Video games, Down’s syndrome and my brother – a personal story

November 14, 2016 |

In 2005, when my brother Euan was still a schoolboy, we used to play a lot of Tekken 5 together. If you’re new to this famed video game series, it’s a one-on-one martial arts simulation – a ferocious yet endearingly flamboyant experience in which kangaroos trade blows with Bruce Lee clones, and winged demons grapple with Mexican wrestlers. And I’m fairly sure Euan is the most savage, unprincipled Tekken 5 player ever to lay his traitorous fingers upon a PlayStation 2 controller. Some combatants prefer to open a bout with a stunning punch to the lower body, but Euan was rarely that noble. “Wait a minute, I want to show you something,” he’d declare, scuttling out of reach. I’d dutifully wander over to his side of the arena, all patronising solicitude, and he’d kick me in the face. Euan is a dirty fighter. But he’s also one of the most…    read more 

Tap Happy Sabotage: four screens, one game

November 14, 2016 |

Alistair Aitcheson likes people to fight over his games. Literally, physically fight right over them. His first smartphone and tablet title, Greedy Bankers, had a multiplayer mode where participants could steal money from each other on screen. His second, Slamjet Stadium, was a futuristic sports sim, in which two opponents fought it out to score goals in a trap-filled arena. Both games encouraged players to interact physically, knocking each other away from the screen, intentionally controlling the other person’s onscreen avatars. He has seen full-blown wrestling matches erupt as a result. His new game, Tap Happy Sabotage, is a continuation of that philosophy into uncharted territory. Developed for an Intel App Innovation competition it was designed to showcase the capabilities of the company’s 27-inch touchscreen monitors. Each player has to pick an icon card to represent them on the screen. The cards have nice pictures of flowers or parrots or…    read more 

The 30 greatest video games that time forgot – part two

November 14, 2016 |

History is not always kind to great games. Titles once heralded as masterworks are often lost as console cycles turn. Alternatively, there are the offbeat outliers completely shunned during their own lifetimes, only to be quietly ransacked by later generations of designers. Here, we be remember 30 brilliant, idiosyncratic, challenging or just plain weird titles that have been erased from the gaming annals, or at least criminally overlooked. Each one of these did something interesting with gaming, just not interesting enough to be endlessly recalled in misty-eyed retro articles or on otherwise pretty good Charlie Brooker documentaries.

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